Amiloride hydrochloride does not have a significant effect on crayfish muscle extensor cells pHi

  • Anabella Matheus Grinnell College
  • Lucia Pasquariello Grinnell College
  • Aliya Singleton Grinnell College

Abstract

Amiloride is a diuretic drug known for its ability to regulate K+ levels and prevent the body from absorbing excessive levels of Na+ by inhibiting FMRF-amide gated Na+ channels (FaNaC channels). Amiloride has the ability to reduce the effect of FMRF-amide peptides on the synapses in the crayfish neuromuscular junction. However, in addition to its ability to block FaNaC channels, it is possible that Amiloride may have offset effects that inhibit normal functioning within the cell. We therefore hypothesize that the addition of Amiloride will make the intracellular pH more acidic. We used fluorescence microscopy to quantify changes in intracellular pH in crayfish extensor muscle cells by comparing the changes in fluorescence between a Ringer’s solution and a solution containing Ringer’s and Amiloride. Through doing this, we found that while the data was not statistically significant, it did tentatively support our hypothesis.

Published
2020-01-28
How to Cite
MATHEUS, Anabella; PASQUARIELLO, Lucia; SINGLETON, Aliya. Amiloride hydrochloride does not have a significant effect on crayfish muscle extensor cells pHi. Pioneering Neuroscience, [S.l.], v. 18, p. 27-30, jan. 2020. Available at: <https://ojs.grinnell.edu/index.php/pnsj/article/view/489>. Date accessed: 10 july 2020.
Section
Articles